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Amy Winehouse Died From ‘Misadventure,’ or Drinking Too Much Alcohol

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In the months following Amy Winehouse's death, her parents believed that -- after years of hard-living and drug and alcohol abuse -- their daughter died due to complications stemming from alcohol withdrawal. "Abstinence [from alcohol] gave her body such a fright, they thought it was eventually the cause of her death," a source close to the family said in July. It turns out, the complete opposite was true: According to the long-awaited coroner's inquest into the singer's death at the age of 27, Winehouse passed away after consuming an excessive amount of booze. The report stated that Amy died of "misadventure," since she voluntarily put the liquor into her system. "The unintended consequence of such potentially fatal levels (of alcohol) was her sudden and unexpected death," the coroner wrote.

The legal limit for operating an automobile in the U.K. is 80 milligrams of alcohol per 100 milliliters of blood. Winehouse's blood-alcohol content at the time of her death: 416 milligrams, over five times the legal limit, Reuters reports. Depending on body type, a blood-alcohol content of 350 milligrams is when fatal alcohol poisoning could occur. Winehouse's ability to imbibe freely was reduced significantly after the singer quit drinking entirely in July, so when the sudden flood of alcohol reentered her system, the shock was too much for her body to handle. The toxicology report also confirmed that no illegal substances were found in the singer's system at the time of her death.

"It is some relief to finally find out what happened to Amy. We understand there was alcohol in her system when she passed away, it is likely a build up of alcohol in her system over a number of days," Winehouse's family said in a statement today. "The court heard that Amy was battling hard to conquer her problems with alcohol and it is a source of great pain to us that she could not win in time. She had started drinking again that week after a period of abstinence. It underlines how important our work with the Amy Winehouse Foundation is to us, to help as many young people and children as we can in her name. It means a lot to us and from the overwhelming messages of support we have had since Amy died, we know she meant a great deal to people all over the world."

 

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