Stop The Presses!

Annie Lennox Wants Some Artists Rated X: "You Know the Ones I'm Talking About"

Tiffany Lee
Stop The Presses!

View photo

.

Annie Lennox performs at the mothers2mothers cocktail party. (Photo by Danny E. Martindale/Getty Images)

For those of you without the patience to read Sinéad O'Connor's many long, open letters to Miley Cryus, then just check out Annie Lennox's Facebook page.

The Grammy-winning singer and Eurythmics front woman offered her two cents in a succinct post addressing "the tidal wave of sexualised [sic] imagery" that is the norm in popular music today.

Lennox held forth on provocative female artists, calling their performances and music videos "soft porn" and "highly styled pornography with musical accompaniment." While she didn't name names, Lennox mentioned that "the 'issue' is whether you want it on awards shows, breakfast television shows, etc…" Just so happens Miley Cyrus was on "The Today Show" Monday, so it's easy to put two and two together.

But instead of lamenting Miley's (and perhaps Britney's and Rihanna's) lack of self-respect, or being used as a music industry pawn, Lennox just wants to shield the impressionable eyes of young fans. "I believe in freedom of speech and expression, but the market forces don't give a toss about the notion of boundaries," she said in one Facebook entry. "As long as there's booty to make money out of, it will be bought and sold... It's a glorified and monetized form of self harm."

A day later she posted that there was nothing "wrong" about sexuality, but if artists with young fans are going to get twerk-happy and such, those particular performances and videos need to be marked X-rated. "I'm talking from the perspective of the parents of those young fans," Lennox elaborated. "The whole thing is about their children's protection. Is it appropriate for seven year olds to be thrusting their pelvises like pole dancers? I really don't think so."

If anything, Lennox has kept her cool about approaching the subject of what is or isn't appropriate for artists to do. While she isn't calling for Miley to put her clothes on, she instead criticizes the industry forces for overexposing young fans to Miley's and her peers' behinds. Perhaps those who are sickened by the whole Miley controversy need to go on the defensive: it's not Miley's job to tone it down, but the public's job to block it out.

Do you think Annie Lennox is in the right? Leave your comments below!

Follow Tiffany on Twitter & Instagram: @tiffanycanfly

Follow "YahooMusic" on Instagram

View Comments