Craig Robinson’s Best Onscreen Moments

Craig Robinson with Kerry Washington in "Peeples."

Craig Robinson has a big summer ahead of him. He's starring in "Peeples" (with Kerry Washington), "Rapture-palooza" (with Anna Kendrick and Ken Jeong) and "This Is the End" (with basically every comedian you’ve ever heard of, including Seth Rogen, James Franco, and Danny McBride). He's also performing live on Yahoo! on May 3 from the United Palace in New York.

While you probably know Robinson from his work on "The Office," he's been on television and film a lot during the last half decade. Here's an abridged walk-through of Robinson's varied (and hilarious) resumé.

Darryl Philbin on 'The Office'

This is the easy one: Darryl started out as the manager of the Dunder Mifflin warehouse, continually butting heads with Steve Carell's Michael Scott. Eventually his role expanded and he ended up upstairs, continuing to dispense wisdom and one-liners while becoming one of the show's most beloved characters. "The Office" is in its final season, but Robinson is already working on another pilot for NBC.

Nick in 'Hot Tub Time Machine'

Probably Robinson's second-most famous role was in this 2010 comedy co-starring John Cusack and Rob Corddry. He gets to perform a cover of "Let's Get It Started," have a one-night stand with "Mad Men" star Jessica Paré, and, perhaps most importantly, explain the entire premise of the movie.

Reg Mackworthy in 'Eastbound & Down'

Robinson plays one of the many rivals of series protagonist Kenny Powers (Danny McBride), allying with Will Ferrell's evil Ashley Schaeffer. Mackworthy is forced to sport an eye patch later in the series after taking one of Powers's 101 mph fastballs to the head. (Here's a compilation of Robinson's scenes as Reg, which contains a lot of explicit language.)

Levon French in 'Reno 911!'

When the Nevada deputies need help making a recruitment commercial, they turn to Robinson's French, a well-known Reno director. Who could resist this pitch?

The doorman in 'Knocked Up'

When Katherine Heigl and Leslie Mann's characters try to skip the line at a Los Angeles club, it falls on Robinson to deny them entry. After getting berated by Mann, Robinson has one of the best scenes in the movie, explaining that he hates his job and the pressure of deciding who gets in and who doesn't. (Here's a video of the scene, but be aware it contains a lot of profanity.)