FILE - This is a Thursday, Oct. 25, 2007 file photo of John Lydon as performs with The Sex Pistols at the Roxy in West Hollywood, Calif., The concert marked the legendary British punk band's first-ever club performance in Southern California. A 70-year-old song is giving the BBC a headache, as it decides whether to play "Ding Dong! The Witch is Dead" _ a song from the "Wizard of Oz" being driven up the charts by opponents of Margaret Thatcher as a mocking memorial to the late prime minister, It's not the first time Britain's national broadcaster has been caught in a bind about whether to ban a song on grounds of language, politics, or taste. And the broadcaster _ nicknamed "Auntie" for its "we-know-what's-good-for-you" attitude usually comes under fire, whatever it does. The Sex Pistol song "God Save the Queen" was banned by the BBC. (AP Photo/Chris Pizzello, File)

Associated Press
FILE -  This is a Thursday, Oct. 25, 2007 file photo of John Lydon  as performs with The Sex Pistols at the Roxy in West Hollywood, Calif., The concert marked the legendary British punk band's first-ever club performance in Southern California.  A 70-year-old song is giving the BBC a headache, as it decides whether to play "Ding Dong! The Witch is Dead" _ a song from the "Wizard of Oz" being driven up the charts by opponents of Margaret Thatcher as a mocking memorial to the late prime minister,  It's not the first time Britain's national broadcaster has been caught in a bind about whether to ban a song on grounds of language, politics, or taste.  And the broadcaster _ nicknamed "Auntie" for its "we-know-what's-good-for-you" attitude  usually comes under fire, whatever it does. The Sex Pistol song "God Save the Queen" was banned by the BBC. (AP Photo/Chris Pizzello, File)
FILE - This is a Thursday, Oct. 25, 2007 file photo of John Lydon as performs with The Sex Pistols at the Roxy in West Hollywood, Calif., The concert marked the legendary British punk band's first-ever club performance in Southern California. A 70-year-old song is giving the BBC a headache, as it decides whether to play "Ding Dong! The Witch is Dead" _ a song from the "Wizard of Oz" being driven up the charts by opponents of Margaret Thatcher as a mocking memorial to the late prime minister, It's not the first time Britain's national broadcaster has been caught in a bind about whether to ban a song on grounds of language, politics, or taste. And the broadcaster _ nicknamed "Auntie" for its "we-know-what's-good-for-you" attitude usually comes under fire, whatever it does. The Sex Pistol song "God Save the Queen" was banned by the BBC. (AP Photo/Chris Pizzello, File)
Sorry you didn't like this comment. Please provide a reason below.

Are you sure?
Rating failed. Try again.
Request failed. Try again.
We will promote constructive and witty comments to the top, so everyone sees them!
Sorry, we can’t load comments right now. Try again.