FILE - In this Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012 file photo, waves wash over a roller coaster from a Seaside Heights, N.J. amusement park that fell in the Atlantic Ocean during superstorm Sandy. Though it’s tricky to link a single weather event to climate change, Hurricane Sandy was “probably not a coincidence” but an example of extreme weather events that are likely to strike the US more often as the world gets warmer, the U.N. climate panel’s No. 2 scientist told the Associated Press Tuesday, Nov. 27, 2012.(AP Photo/Mike Groll, File)

Associated Press
FILE - In this Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012 file photo, waves wash over a roller coaster from a Seaside Heights, N.J. amusement park that fell in the Atlantic Ocean during superstorm Sandy. Though it’s tricky to link a single weather event to climate change, Hurricane Sandy was “probably not a coincidence” but an example of extreme weather events that are likely to strike the US more often as the world gets warmer, the U.N. climate panel’s No. 2 scientist told the Associated Press Tuesday, Nov. 27, 2012.(AP Photo/Mike Groll, File)
FILE - In this Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012 file photo, waves wash over a roller coaster from a Seaside Heights, N.J. amusement park that fell in the Atlantic Ocean during superstorm Sandy. Though it’s tricky to link a single weather event to climate change, Hurricane Sandy was “probably not a coincidence” but an example of extreme weather events that are likely to strike the US more often as the world gets warmer, the U.N. climate panel’s No. 2 scientist told the Associated Press Tuesday, Nov. 27, 2012.(AP Photo/Mike Groll, File)
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