This undated picture released by the National Science Foundation on Wednesday, July 11, 2012, shows a close-up of an adult male gnathiid parasite. Arkansas State University marine biologist Paul Sikkel discovered the tiny blood-sucking marine parasite, a new species within the family of gnathiids, that infests fish on Caribbean coral reefs and named it "Gnathia marleyi" after Jamaican reggae icon Bob Marley. (AP Photo/National Science Foundation, John Artim, Department of Biology, Arkansas State University)

Associated Press
This undated picture released by the National Science Foundation on Wednesday, July 11, 2012, shows a close-up of an adult male gnathiid parasite. Arkansas State University marine biologist Paul Sikkel discovered the tiny blood-sucking marine parasite, a new species within the family of gnathiids, that infests fish on Caribbean coral reefs and named it "Gnathia marleyi" after Jamaican reggae icon Bob Marley. (AP Photo/National Science Foundation,  John Artim, Department of Biology, Arkansas State University)
This undated picture released by the National Science Foundation on Wednesday, July 11, 2012, shows a close-up of an adult male gnathiid parasite. Arkansas State University marine biologist Paul Sikkel discovered the tiny blood-sucking marine parasite, a new species within the family of gnathiids, that infests fish on Caribbean coral reefs and named it "Gnathia marleyi" after Jamaican reggae icon Bob Marley. (AP Photo/National Science Foundation, John Artim, Department of Biology, Arkansas State University)
Sorry you didn't like this comment. Please provide a reason below.

Are you sure?
Rating failed. Try again.
Request failed. Try again.
We will promote constructive and witty comments to the top, so everyone sees them!
Sorry, we can’t load comments right now. Try again.